China Wants $2.4 Billion from the U.S. Over an Old WTO Tariff Dispute

Matthew McMullan

Matthew McMullan Communications Manager, Alliance for American Manufacturing

Amid an enormous trade war between the U.S. and Chinese governments, China’s trying to get $2.4 billion from the United States for its non-compliance with a World Trade Organization (WTO) ruling over the legitimacy of tariffs from the Obama era.

Yes, that’s right: In 2012 China disputed the application of a bunch of tariffs on solar panels, wind turbines, and certain steel and aluminum products, and a WTO appeals court agreed that some of the U.S. tariffs were unfair. From Reuters:

China’s request appears on the agenda of the (Dispute Settlement Body) set for Oct. 28. The United States could challenge the amount of retaliatory sanctions sought, which could send the long-running dispute to arbitration.

The office of U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) Robert Lighthizer has said the WTO ruling recognized that the United States had proved that China used state-owned enterprises to subsidize and distort its economy.

But the ruling also said the United States must accept Chinese prices to measure subsidies, even though USTR viewed those prices as “distorted”.

Without having read the text of the WTO ruling, that ruling seems kinda odd ... despite being in a vein similar to previous WTO rulings against the U.S. It’s well documented that China has for years subsidized the friggin’ heck out of these industries, saturating some of them so much that they caused global overcapacity problems. And accepting Chinese prices to measure subsidies would seem to fly in the face of the fact that China remains a non-market economy.

The lawyers are gonna wrestle this one out, and we’ll keep an eye on it. This case is illustrative, though, of a larger point: The trade policies pushed by the Chinese government were a problem before Donald Trump became president. And although negotiations toward a comprehensive deal continue, and although it’s a good thing that this guy has (however ham-handedly) squared off with China over its unfair trade practices, these problems are almost guaranteed to continue after him.

This is a long game. Whatever deal the USTR is able to reach with his Chinese counterparts needs to be a comprehensive as possible. No settling for soybeans!

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Reposted from AAM

There is Dignity in All Work

There is Dignity in All Work

Union Matters

Get to Know AFL-CIO's Affiliates: National Association of Letter Carriers

From the AFL-CIO

Next up in our series that takes a deeper look at each of our affiliates is the National Association of Letter Carriers.

Name of Union: National Association of Letter Carriers (NALC)

Mission: To unite fraternally all city letter carriers employed by the U.S. Postal Service for their mutual benefit; to obtain and secure rights as employees of the USPS and to strive at all times to promote the safety and the welfare of every member; to strive for the constant improvement of the Postal Service; and for other purposes. NALC is a single-craft union and is the sole collective-bargaining agent for city letter carriers.

Current Leadership of Union: Fredric V. Rolando serves as president of NALC, after being sworn in as the union's 18th president in 2009. Rolando began his career as a letter carrier in 1978 in South Miami before moving to Sarasota in 1984. He was elected president of Branch 2148 in 1988 and served in that role until 1999. In the ensuing years, he worked in various roles for NALC before winning his election as a national officer in 2002, when he was elected director of city delivery. In 2006, he won election as executive vice president. Rolando was re-elected as NALC president in 2010, 2014 and 2018.

Brian Renfroe serves as executive vice president, Lew Drass as vice president, Nicole Rhine as secretary-treasurer, Paul Barner as assistant secretary-treasurer, Christopher Jackson as director of city delivery, Manuel L. Peralta Jr. as director of safety and health, Dan Toth as director of retired members, Stephanie Stewart as director of the Health Benefit Plan and James W. “Jim” Yates as director of life insurance.

Number of Members: 291,000 active and retired letter carriers.

Members Work As: City letter carriers.

Industries Represented: The United States Postal Service.

History: In 1794, the first letter carriers were appointed by Congress as the implementation of the new U.S. Constitution was being put into effect. By the time of the Civil War, free delivery of city mail was established and letter carriers successfully concluded a campaign for the eight-hour workday in 1888. The next year, letter carriers came together in Milwaukee and the National Association of Letter Carriers was formed.

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