Trump's Steel and Aluminum Tariffs Will Create Jobs and Secure America's Industrial Base

From the Alliance for American Manufacturing

President Donald Trump on Thursday announced he expects to issue a 25 percent tariff on imported steel in response to the national security investigation he initiated last spring.

The need for steel action remains clear, according to Commerce Department findings that point to at least 10 blast furnaces closing since 2000. Meanwhile, steel imports continue to surge with an increase of over 15 percent in 2017.

Said Alliance for American Manufacturing (AAM) President Scott Paul: 

"President Trump made an encouraging show of support when he met with steel industry executives today. Now it's time to act on the Section 232 investigation.

"We're on the brink of a potentially historic rebalance of America's trade priorities. As we noted in a letter to the president this week and our cable TV ad, we are confident a robust steel trade action is good for our economy. A decision to retore sanity to global steel markets will help create domestic jobs and preserve our national security.

"But to achieve those results, the president's enforcement action must be broad, robust and comprehensive. We urge the president to stand by our nation's steel communities. They are counting on him to follow through on this."

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The Real Root of Poverty

The Real Root of Poverty

Union Matters

A Fierce Defender of Truth and Classic Opulence

Sam Pizzigati

Sam Pizzigati Editor, Too Much online magazine

Rolls-Royce CEO Torsten Müller-Ötvös sees himself as the custodian of a hallowed brand — and woe be to anyone who dares dispute Rolls supremacy in the universe of ultra luxury. This past March, Müller-Ötvös lit into an Aston Martin exec who had the temerity of suggesting that the traditional Rolls design amounted to an outmoded “ancient Greece.” An “enraged” Müller-Ötvös, Auto News reported, fumed that Aston Martin had “zero clue” about the ultra rich and then accused other carmakers of stealing Rolls-Royce intellectual property. Last summer, Müller-Ötvös rushed to defend the $650,000 price-tag on one Rolls model after a reporter told him that his son wondered why anyone who could afford to “fly to the moon” would choose to buy a Rolls instead. Rolls patrons, the 58-year-old CEO harrumphed back, hold at least $30 million in personal wealth: “They don’t have to choose. They can fly to the moon as well.”

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