The Top 10 Percent Must Pay Their Share in Taxes

Hugh J. Campbell

Hugh J. Campbell Son of a steelworker, Philadelphia, Pa.

As the top 10 perent now owns 77 percent of U.S. wealth, the lion's share of defense spending to protect their wealth has ballooned, with defense appropriation reaching $700 billion. This is $81 billion greater than last year, defying “sequestration” spending caps set in the 2011 Budget Control Act.

Among the top two priorities of the super donor class are free trade and robust defense spending, with this spending appearing to be the third rail for these super donors as the Senate votes 89 to 9 for the Pentagon bill. In addition, 45 has back-peddled on his campaign promise to label China a currency manipulator in the name of national security. This panders to the super donor class by prioritizing both of their highly valued issues.

At a time when most Americans feel less safe because of lack of adequate gun-control and climate change denial in the beltway, we have 45 proposing huge tax cuts for himself, his family and the top 10 percent. With ever-increasing wealth inequity and related defense spending, combined with tax-cuts for the rich, the rational response is a wealth tax on the top percenters to pay for the lion's share of defense spending, which goes toward protecting their assets worldwide.                                                            

We often hear the wealthy should pay their fair share of taxes, but without specific rationale. With defense spending viewed as protecting assets, as well as life and limb, it is easy to justify a specific tax on the top percenters for the huge cost of protecting their assets here and abroad.

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Hugh Campbell is a seasoned financial professional, currently providing subject matter expertise on a variety of regulatory topics, including the Dodd-Frank Act, the Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act (FATCA) and overall compliance monitoring. Hugh has previously held positions as Chief Risk Officer (CRO), Chief Audit Executive (CAE) and Director of Sarbanes-Oxley (SOX) Compliance.

The Dirty Truth about Janus

The Dirty Truth about Janus

Union Matters

Home Health Care Workers Under Attack

By Bethany Swanson
USW Intern

Home health care workers have important but difficult jobs that require them to work long hours and chaotic schedules to care for the country’s rapidly growing elder population.

Instead of protecting these workers, the vast majority of whom are women and people of color, the current administration plans to make it harder for them to belong to unions, stifling their best chance for improving working conditions and wages.

The anti-union measure would roll back an Obama-era rule that allows home care workers, whose services are paid for through Medicaid, to choose to have their union dues deducted directly from their paychecks.

The goal of the rule, like the recent Janus decision and other anti-union campaigns, is to starve unions out of existence, so they can no longer protect their members.

Home health care workers bathe, dress, feed and monitor the health of the sick and elderly, but they often cannot afford to provide for their own families.

On average, they make little more than $10 an hour and more than half rely on some sort of public assistance. Most receive few or no benefits, even though home care workers and other direct care workers have some of the highest injury rates of any occupation.

That’s why many home care workers have turned to labor unions.

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